The Time Tribe

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FRIDAY FIND: 2500-year-old Chariot Jam
Suffice it to say that chariot excavations are rarely so straightforward. Even those from a tomb, like this one from  Louyang, China.
Why just one chariot and two sets of horses? The left-hand pair goes with a different chariot, just outside the frame. 

FRIDAY FIND: 2500-year-old Chariot Jam

Suffice it to say that chariot excavations are rarely so straightforward. Even those from a tomb, like this one from  Louyang, China.

Why just one chariot and two sets of horses? The left-hand pair goes with a different chariot, just outside the frame. 

Filed under archaeology history Louyang China Chinese chariots tomb relics

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Few are left to tell the story of the D-Day landings, but today, as we remember the sacrifices and heroism of troops involved in the landings, these pictures of tourists soaking up the sun on Normandy’s beaches stand in stark contrast to haunting images taken around the time of the crucial invasion.

In a mission described by wartime Prime Minister Winston Churchill as “undoubtedly the most complicated and difficult that has ever taken place”, D-Day was the beginning of an 80-day campaign to liberate the region which involved three million troops and cost 250,000 lives.

See more images, plus captions, here at The Huffington Post.

Filed under d-day 70th anniversary historic photography art photography history WWII remembrance huffington post

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obitoftheday:

Obit of the Day (Historical): Jimmie Monteith and John Pinder (1944)

Twelve men earned the Congressional Medal of Honor for actions taken on June 6, 1944 during the invasion of Normandy. Only two of those men died on that day*. First Lieutenant Jimmie Monteith and Technician Fifth Grade John J. Pinder, Jr. made the ultimate sacrifice while at the same time acting with “conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of life above and beyond the call of duty.”

Lt. Monteith emulated leadership while risking his personal safety throughout the first wave of the invasion. He was recognized for running back and forth across the exposed beach organizing men to take strategic positions. Later that day he led two tanks through a minefield in order to establish firing positions and remove German defensive positions. Again he risked personal safety to cement his troops and the position. Eventually he and his men were surrounded by enemy tank fire and he was killed. 

That same day, Technician 5th Grade John J. Pinder was hit while coming ashore carrying radio equipment. Bleeding and in great pain, Technician Pinder returned to the water on three separate occasions to recover communication equipment and bring it ashore, including another working radio. He was hit a second time in the legs and dragged himself across the beach to ensure that communications were set up. He was killed when he was hit a third time while on the beach.

Lt. Jimmie Monteith died on June 6, 1944 at the age of 26. Technician John Pinder died at the age of 32 - June 6 was his birthday.

Sources: US Army’s D-Day page and Wikipedia

(Image of 1st Lt. Jimmie Monteith is courtesy of blog.USAMM.com and Technician 5th Grade John Pinder is courtesy of wikimedia.org)

* Of the other ten D-Day Medal of Honor winners, seven died not long after the invasions and were honored posthumously. The most famous of these men was General Theodore Roosevelt, Jr., the son of the former president, making them the only father and son to earn the Medal of Honor. The other three died years after the war: Carlton W. Barrett (1986), Carlos Ogden (2001), and Walter Ehlers, the last D-Day MOH recipient to die (February 20, 2014). Mr. Ehlers was featured on Obit of the Day. 

Other relevant posts on Obit of the Day:

John Baker - Medal of Honor

Van Barfoot - Medal of Honor

William Charette - Medal of Honor

Mike Colallilo - Minnesota’s last Medal of Honor recipient

Rear Admiral Isaac Kidd - Medal of Honor recipient, Pearl Harbor

Charles P. Murray - Medal of Honor

Nicholas Oresko - Oldest living Medal of Honor recipient

Paul Wiedorfer - Maryland’s last Medal of Honor recipient

Filed under d-day 70th anniversary wwii heroes

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100-Year-Old Negatives Discovered in Block of Ice in Antarctica

The exposed but unprocessed negatives are believed to be from Ernest Shackleton’s 1914-1917 Ross Sea Party, a group that was stranded in the hut where the film was found ,during a blizzard when their ship blew out to sea.

The explorers eventually were eventually rescued, but the box remained buried until now.

Filed under Antarctic explorers historic photography time travel time capsule The Time Tribe Ernest Shackleton

708 notes &

xpishposhapplesaucex:

I became a nerdfighter in October 2013 in a somewhat unconventional way. The Fault In Our Stars was a book I had wanted but was hesitant to get, which is crazy now considering I recommend it to everyone I know. It’s probably annoying, actually. Anyway, TFIOS was in the pile of books that I would grab at my local Barnes and Noble (I usually grab somewhere between seven to thirteen books to leaf through before I decide), but it always went on my goodreads because something else would pull me in. Until I went to Minneapolis in the aforementioned October with a then-boyfriend (should that be hyphenated?) The particular book I grabbed had a sticky note that read “Hello reader of this particalar John Green book. You may or may not know this, but you are probably a nerdfighter. Read this book, then, go to YouTube.com/vlogbrothers. You will love this new lifestyle! Love, Nerdfighteria”. (Good punctuation helps in roping in a nerd, I think)
I looked in all the other books thinking that they had to have put more notes in them in case someone picked this one up. The one I had grabbed was the only one with a note. Curiosity piqued, I bought the book and I’m so happy I did. I now own all of John Green’s books and I just finished reading This Star Won’t Go Out. It’s changed my outlook on life and made me feel more connected to people who are into all the things I’m into, who strive to end world suck, and who proudly shout DFTBA! So I have to thank that person who wrote that note, whoever they are and wherever they may be. They’ve given me much more than I could hope for.
P.S. The picture is of the original note that still sits in the book. fishingboatproceeds
P.P.S. For some reason, I couldn’t get this to post properly the first couple times so if this happens to pop up as a notification on John Greens tumblr that I tried (like, three times) to tag him in and it says crazy stuff, I’m really sorry, John! How do I Internet?!?!

So true - we’re all Nerdfighters on some level, or should be!
Speaking of which, any Nerdfighter who has yet to play #TheTimeTribe adventure game is in for some awesome #Nerdfighteria Easter Eggs!
Check it out at www.thetimetribe.com

xpishposhapplesaucex:

I became a nerdfighter in October 2013 in a somewhat unconventional way. The Fault In Our Stars was a book I had wanted but was hesitant to get, which is crazy now considering I recommend it to everyone I know. It’s probably annoying, actually. Anyway, TFIOS was in the pile of books that I would grab at my local Barnes and Noble (I usually grab somewhere between seven to thirteen books to leaf through before I decide), but it always went on my goodreads because something else would pull me in. Until I went to Minneapolis in the aforementioned October with a then-boyfriend (should that be hyphenated?) The particular book I grabbed had a sticky note that read “Hello reader of this particalar John Green book. You may or may not know this, but you are probably a nerdfighter. Read this book, then, go to YouTube.com/vlogbrothers. You will love this new lifestyle! Love, Nerdfighteria”. (Good punctuation helps in roping in a nerd, I think)

I looked in all the other books thinking that they had to have put more notes in them in case someone picked this one up. The one I had grabbed was the only one with a note. Curiosity piqued, I bought the book and I’m so happy I did. I now own all of John Green’s books and I just finished reading This Star Won’t Go Out. It’s changed my outlook on life and made me feel more connected to people who are into all the things I’m into, who strive to end world suck, and who proudly shout DFTBA! So I have to thank that person who wrote that note, whoever they are and wherever they may be. They’ve given me much more than I could hope for.

P.S. The picture is of the original note that still sits in the book. fishingboatproceeds

P.P.S. For some reason, I couldn’t get this to post properly the first couple times so if this happens to pop up as a notification on John Greens tumblr that I tried (like, three times) to tag him in and it says crazy stuff, I’m really sorry, John! How do I Internet?!?!

So true - we’re all Nerdfighters on some level, or should be!

Speaking of which, any Nerdfighter who has yet to play #TheTimeTribe adventure game is in for some awesome #Nerdfighteria Easter Eggs!

Check it out at www.thetimetribe.com

(via effyeahnerdfighters)

Filed under Nerdfighters Recruitment The Time Tribe History Archaeology Adventure game Story game

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Cats on the interwebz? Take this!

Our Friday Find is a fierce one.  And a cute one. 

This ”Londinium” lion recovered by Museum of London Archaeology
cuts a dashing figure.

Lions are common motifs in ancient Roman art but this is one of a relatively few free-standing lion figurines found in Britain. His pose is quite dramatic, suggesting movement and power, but the years have not been kind to him. Corrosion has eaten away a patch of his once mighty mane.

Filed under MOLAS londinium ancient Rome ancient art lion Roman Britain The Time Tribe internet cats cat memes

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We’re stylin’ in the 17th century

72. That’s how many copies of the Gold Edition (replete with Time Tribe Membership swag and cryptic story clues) will soon be nestled into their very own display rack in the Plimoth Plantation gift shop.

It’s our very first retail placement, and there’s nowhere we’d rather be.

HUZZAH!

For those who don’t know it, Plimoth Plantation is one of the United States’ premier living history museums.

So it’s one of those carefully recreated landscapes you stroll through, ducking at will into replica buildings to have a look around. Costumed actors come and go about their daily tasks, happy to chat, bringing us as close as we’ve yet worked out to time travel.

Their main focus is interpreting the Colonial English and Native American cultures that collided in the 17th-century Plymouth Colony (Plimoth being one of the most popular of various spellings the colonists themselves used).

But Plimoth Plantation is equally committed to igniting the spark of interest in history more generally, and how historians and archaeologists DO their work.

And that makes it a perfect partner for us.

Filed under Plimoth Plantation time travel tourism history tourism living history adventure game history archaeology